5/5/13

Money DOES Buy Happiness?

I have literally NO idea what is going on in this photo. And,
if I am being honest, I don't even know why we presume
the woman in yoga pants is even happy at all!
I was catching up on some reading this morning and came across this piece from The Atlantic. I'll save you the reading and give you the key point: research has proven money DOES buy happiness. Specifically that people (families and/or nations) with more wealth seem to be more happy and satisfied than those without. More over, the argument that $75,000 is some magic point where happiness peaks out, seems flawed too. Apparently for every time money doubles ($2,000 vs. $1,000) happiness doubles for those that have it.

I think I have a post about money and happiness elsewhere on this blog (you go find out, I'm way too lazy these days) but I'll say this - four months in to a daily panic over money - I'm no more or less happy today than I was the day I found out my income (money) was being taken away and that my savings, severance, and unemployment were going to be the only money (finite as it clearly is/was) I had until I got back to work.

I can totally see the argument . . . if you're not scraping for your next meal or worried about the electricity, you are happier. And if you have all the money you could ever possibly want or need so you don't worry about/fret over/or scrap for ANYTHING, you should be extremely happy. But I don't know that comfort and happiness and satisfaction and security and joy are all interchangeable terms (in defense of the article - it is not suggested they are - it is almost the opposite actually).

I will be HAPPIER when I get back to work and I fully anticipate and accept having to take a salary cut (perhaps even a BIG one). That's okay. I will be happier anyway. But not for having money. For having piece of mind. Sorta' security. Health insurance. Faster Internet speed (Why? Because I can!). More elaborate meals at home and out. Fuller clothing options for kiddo and me. I'll have more freedom and more options. But I don't think I'll be truly happier so much for the money as for the things it affords me.